Jobs available at the Saddle Lake Career Fair and Trade Show

The Saddle Lake Career Fair and Trade Show on August 25 saw various organizations offer potential opportunities to job seekers. Tables were also set up at the Manitou Kihew Arena to showcase an assortment of merchandise from local small business owners.

SADDLE LAKE – The Saddle Lake Career Fair and Trade Show on August 25 saw various organizations offer potential opportunities to job seekers. Tables were also set up at the Manitou Kihew Arena to showcase an assortment of merchandise from local small business owners.

Tanis Redcrow, Career Fair 2022 coordinator, said the event went well and was a step towards normality, given the COVID shutdowns over the past two years. The event was well attended with over 55 organizations and vendors attending the job fair and over 15 vendors at the trade show.

“On the lounge area, [tables] were offered free to sellers so they could come and make a little profit and show off their wares,” Redcrow said. “With the job fair, we had a lot of turnout and one of my hopes is that we get a lot of jobs after that.”

The Christian Labor Association of Canada (CLAC) is a union representing a variety of companies in multiple industries. The group was on hand to promote skilled trades and apprenticeship pathways. Kari-Anne March of CLAC said there is a massive demand for skilled workers across Canada due to the retirement of a large portion of the workforce.

“We need young people to see the skilled trades as a viable career option, not just a secondary back-up plan,” March said.

Vinette Kooger, also from CLAC, said she is motivated by the large pool of Indigenous youth in Alberta, particularly in Treaty 6 territory. can provide skilled trades workers.

Among the companies present at the job fair was Peyasew Oilfield Services. The company provides training on heavy equipment. Gabe Collins, the company’s construction manager, said: “The skills we teach students are basically how to operate and understand the equipment.”

He explained that students get hands-on experience with a variety of heavy equipment, as it is difficult for people to enter some industrial enterprises without prior experience.

Ridgeline Canada provides a variety of environmental services and was also on hand to provide career opportunities. Indigenous Training Advisor Jay Woosaree said Ridgeline works with post-secondary institutions to train people interested in a career in environmental services.

sergeant. Meg Kennedy, Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), also provided information on opportunities for Indigenous peoples to join the CAF, including summer training programs, the Armed Forces Aboriginal Entry Program (CAFIEP) and the Year of Aboriginal Leadership Opportunities (ALOY). ALOY offers a year-long education and leadership experience at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) in Kingston, Ont., according to Kennedy.

Alberta Health Services (AHS) and Lakeland Primary Care Network (PCN) were also on hand to provide information on opportunities for people considering a career in health care.

Tradeshow

On the other side of the job fair, vendors, including Jilleon Steinhauer, were selling a variety of merchandise. Steinhauer said, “We sell pearl jewelry, bags, skirts, we have beanies, and just a lot of jewelry.”

The first and one of only two boys and girls clubs within First Nations communities across Canada, BGC Saddle Lake is a non-profit boys and girls club that operates in Saddle Lake. Stacey Harrison, executive director, said the club had been running for 30 years.

“We’re starting our programming for the fall semesters and we’re going to have after-school drop-in programs,” Harrison said. “We are hiring new staff for after-school programs, restorative justice staff, and hopefully we can set up programs for kids here.

Commenting on the success of this year’s job fair, Redcrow said: “I hope it’s something we can continue to do as we’ve opened up to everyone. She said she was grateful to everyone involved, suppliers, employers and recruiters, as well as the public.

“Especially here in Saddle Lake, not everyone has access to the internet, and they don’t see what kinds of businesses and organizations are there,” she explained. “It opened the door for them to let them know that these people are out there looking for a job.”

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