Photos: Northland’s top student businesses on display at the Kerikeri Trade Fair

Kerikeri, 18, Sky Gundry has won the show for the second consecutive year with Sky’s Surf School, which aims to give young women confidence in the water. Photo / Peter de Graaf

For the second year in a row, a teenager from Kerikeri has won a Northland-wide competition for the best student company with a surf school aimed at giving young women confidence in the water.

Sky’s Surf School, founded by 18-year-old Sky Gundry, was judged the best entry for stand presentation and willingness to engage with the public at the Young Enterprise Scheme trade show held at the Old Market on Saturday Kerikeri Packhouse.

Second place was won by Moerewa Rosalyn Davis-Rawiri, 21, who attends the Hiwa-i-te-Rangi teenage parent school, for a company called Kānara Aoroa producing decorative candles in female form. Third prize went to Ella Parker, 16, from Ōpua, and Thomas Fewtrell, 18, from Kerikeri, for a teenage sailing school called Sail Inc.

The Customer Choice Award was won by Jacob Fewtrell for Insight, a company that makes automated solar lights.

Coordinator Gary Larkan said 47 student companies from all over Northland attended the trade show. The event drew a large crowd and more than half of the booths sold out.

The lucky customers who went home with $250 supermarket vouchers were Hurimae Latimer from Panguru and Val Mack from Kerikeri.

Rosalyn Davis-Rawiri, 21, from Moerewa, Hiwa-i-te-Rangi school for teenage parents, came second for her company Kānara Aoroa, which produces decorative female-shaped candles.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Rosalyn Davis-Rawiri, 21, from Moerewa, Hiwa-i-te-Rangi school for teenage parents, came second for her company Kānara Aoroa, which produces decorative female-shaped candles. Photo / Peter de Graaf

James Poon, 16, of Kerikeri High, Kerikeri, and Justin Choi, 17, of Paihia, made a quick trade of the dalgona candy made famous on the Korean TV series Squid Game.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
James Poon, 16, of Kerikeri High, Kerikeri, and Justin Choi, 17, of Paihia, made a quick trade of the dalgona candy made famous on the Korean TV series Squid Game. Photo / Peter de Graaf

Kerikeri High School students Ella Parker, 16, from Ōpua, and Thomas Fewtrell, 18, from Kerikeri, placed third for their sailing school Sail Inc. Photo/Peter de Graaf
Kerikeri High School students Ella Parker, 16, from Ōpua, and Thomas Fewtrell, 18, from Kerikeri, placed third for their sailing school Sail Inc. Photo/Peter de Graaf

Kerikeri, Te Ururoa Snowden, 16, created a book called Mapi Rongoā on the medicinal properties of native plants.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kerikeri, Te Ururoa Snowden, 16, created a book called Mapi Rongoā on the medicinal properties of native plants. Photo / Peter de Graaf

Kaitaia College students, left to right, Trinity Day (17, Kaitaia), Aimee Brien (17, Pukenui) and Electra De Valli (17, Kaitaia) have created versatile tote bags from recycled fabric .  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kaitaia College students, left to right, Trinity Day (17, Kaitaia), Aimee Brien (17, Pukenui) and Electra De Valli (17, Kaitaia) have created versatile tote bags from recycled fabric . Photo / Peter de Graaf

Norma Peita, 17, and Lilli Baxter, 17, students at the Panguru area school, make healing balms from traditional remedies and plants they pick themselves.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Norma Peita, 17, and Lilli Baxter, 17, students at the Panguru area school, make healing balms from traditional remedies and plants they pick themselves. Photo / Peter de Graaf

Komene Te Tai, 15, from Te Kura Taumata o Panguru, makes a hand sanitizer made from mānuka and aloe vera called Maloiee.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Komene Te Tai, 15, from Te Kura Taumata o Panguru, makes a hand sanitizer made from mānuka and aloe vera called Maloiee. Photo / Peter de Graaf

Jacob Fewtrell, 18, of Kerikeri Secondary School, won the Customer's Choice Award for this Insight solar-powered automated light for mailboxes, driveways, sheds and log boxes.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Jacob Fewtrell, 18, of Kerikeri Secondary School, won the Customer’s Choice Award for this Insight solar-powered automated light for mailboxes, driveways, sheds and log boxes. Photo / Peter de Graaf

Kaitaia College's Coffee and Co makes scented candles using beeswax, coffee grounds and gasoline.  From left to right, Rose Kake (17, Kaitaia), Travis Horan (17, Kaitaia) and Bailey Nattrass (17, Houhora).  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kaitaia College’s Coffee and Co makes scented candles using beeswax, coffee grounds and gasoline. From left to right, Rose Kake (17, Kaitaia), Travis Horan (17, Kaitaia) and Bailey Nattrass (17, Houhora). Photo / Peter de Graaf

Amelie Loots, 16, from the Tauraroa area school, runs Ball.drobe, a non-profit prom dress rental company.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Amelie Loots, 16, from the Tauraroa area school, runs Ball.drobe, a non-profit prom dress rental company. Photo / Peter de Graaf

Laykeen Cherrington (Moerewa, 22) and Phoenix Nathan-Young (Kawakawa, 23), from school for teenage parents Hiwa-i-te-Rangi, produce custom masks under the Cover Up brand.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Laykeen Cherrington (Moerewa, 22) and Phoenix Nathan-Young (Kawakawa, 23), from school for teenage parents Hiwa-i-te-Rangi, produce custom masks under the Cover Up brand. Photo / Peter de Graaf

Candles made by Rosalyn Davis-Rawiri, 21, of the Hiwa-i-te-Rangi school for teenage parents, were a hit at the Saturday market.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Candles made by Rosalyn Davis-Rawiri, 21, of the Hiwa-i-te-Rangi school for teenage parents, were a hit at the Saturday market. Photo / Peter de Graaf

Kerikeri, Cameron Ireland, 16, invented Helping Hand, a device that allows people with shoulder problems to reach for their seat belt.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kerikeri, Cameron Ireland, 16, invented Helping Hand, a device that allows people with shoulder problems to reach for their seat belt. Photo / Peter de Graaf

Hawaiian-themed Lily Curel and Tamzin Terry, 16, of Herbies, a Whangārei fundraising business specializing in catering and event management.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Hawaiian-themed Lily Curel and Tamzin Terry, 16, of Herbies, a Whangārei fundraising business specializing in catering and event management. Photo / Peter de Graaf

Kerikeri Danielle Talbot, 16, of DFrost, makes post-watersports ponchos from recycled fabric.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Kerikeri Danielle Talbot, 16, of DFrost, makes post-watersports ponchos from recycled fabric. Photo / Peter de Graaf

Lindsay Adams, 16, from Cable Bay, makes hand-dyed macrame keychains, potted plant holders and wall hangings under the Never Ending Knots brand.  Photo / Peter de Graaf
Lindsay Adams, 16, from Cable Bay, makes hand-dyed macrame keychains, potted plant holders and wall hangings under the Never Ending Knots brand. Photo / Peter de Graaf

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